Builtin Functions

Table of Contents

The system provides various classes of functions to support operations on numeric, string, spatial, and temporal data. This document explains how to use these functions.

Numeric Functions

abs

  • Syntax:

    abs(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes the absolute value of the argument.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • The absolute value of the argument with the same type as the input argument,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": abs(2013), "v2": abs(-4036), "v3": abs(0), "v4": abs(float("-2013.5")), "v5": abs(double("-2013.593823748327284")) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 2013, "v2": 4036, "v3": 0, "v4": 2013.5, "v5": 2013.5938237483274 }
    

acos

  • Syntax:

    acos(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes the arc cosine value of the argument.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • the double arc cosine in radians for the argument, if the argument is in the range of -1 (inclusive) to 1 (inclusive),
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error,
    • NaN for other legitimate numeric values.
  • Example:

    { "v1": acos(1), "v2": acos(2), "v3": acos(0), "v4": acos(float("0.5")), "v5": acos(double("-0.5")) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 0.0, "v2": NaN, "v3": 1.5707963267948966, "v4": 1.0471975511965979, "v5": 2.0943951023931957 }
    

asin

  • Syntax:

    asin(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes the arc sine value of the argument.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • the double arc sin in radians for the argument, if the argument is in the range of -1 (inclusive) to 1 (inclusive),
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error,
    • NaN for other legitimate numeric values.
  • Example:

    { "v1": asin(1), "v2": asin(2), "v3": asin(0), "v4": asin(float("0.5")), "v5": asin(double("-0.5")) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 1.5707963267948966, "v2": NaN, "v3": 0.0, "v4": 0.5235987755982989, "v5": -0.5235987755982989 }
    

atan

  • Syntax:

    atan(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes the arc tangent value of the argument.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • the double arc tangent in radians for the argument,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": atan(1), "v2": atan(2), "v3": atan(0), "v4": atan(float("0.5")), "v5": atan(double("1000")) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 0.7853981633974483, "v2": 1.1071487177940904, "v3": 0.0, "v4": 0.4636476090008061, "v5": 1.5697963271282298 }
    

atan2

  • Syntax:

    atan2(numeric_value1, numeric_value2)
    
  • Computes the arc tangent value of numeric_value2/numeric_value1.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value1: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value,
    • numeric_value2: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • the double arc tangent in radians for numeric_value1 and numeric_value2,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": atan2(1, 2), "v2": atan2(0, 4), "v3": atan2(float("0.5"), double("-0.5")) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 0.4636476090008061, "v2": 0.0, "v3": 2.356194490192345 }
    

ceil

  • Syntax:

    ceil(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes the smallest (closest to negative infinity) number with no fractional part that is not less than the value of the argument. If the argument is already equal to mathematical integer, then the result is the same as the argument.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • The ceiling value for the given number in the same type as the input argument,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    {
      "v1": ceil(2013),
      "v2": ceil(-4036),
      "v3": ceil(0.3),
      "v4": ceil(float("-2013.2")),
      "v5": ceil(double("-2013.893823748327284"))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 2013, "v2": -4036, "v3": 1.0, "v4": -2013.0, "v5": -2013.0 }
    

cos

  • Syntax:

    cos(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes the cosine value of the argument.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • the double cosine value for the argument,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": cos(1), "v2": cos(2), "v3": cos(0), "v4": cos(float("0.5")), "v5": cos(double("1000")) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 0.5403023058681398, "v2": -0.4161468365471424, "v3": 1.0, "v4": 0.8775825618903728, "v5": 0.562379076290703 }
    

exp

  • Syntax:

    exp(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes enumeric_value.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • enumeric_value,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": exp(1), "v2": exp(2), "v3": exp(0), "v4": exp(float("0.5")), "v5": exp(double("1000")) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 2.718281828459045, "v2": 7.38905609893065, "v3": 1.0, "v4": 1.6487212707001282, "v5": Infinity }
    

floor

  • Syntax:

    floor(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes the largest (closest to positive infinity) number with no fractional part that is not greater than the value. If the argument is already equal to mathematical integer, then the result is the same as the argument.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • The floor value for the given number in the same type as the input argument,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    {
      "v1": floor(2013),
      "v2": floor(-4036),
      "v3": floor(0.8),
      "v4": floor(float("-2013.2")),
      "v5": floor(double("-2013.893823748327284"))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 2013, "v2": -4036, "v3": 0.0, "v4": -2014.0, "v5": -2014.0 }
    

ln

  • Syntax:

    ln(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes logenumeric_value.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • logenumeric_value,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": ln(1), "v2": ln(2), "v3": ln(0), "v4": ln(float("0.5")), "v5": ln(double("1000")) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 0.0, "v2": 0.6931471805599453, "v3": -Infinity, "v4": -0.6931471805599453, "v5": 6.907755278982137 }
    

log

  • Syntax:

    log(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes log10numeric_value.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • log10numeric_value,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": log(1), "v2": log(2), "v3": log(0), "v4": log(float("0.5")), "v5": log(double("1000")) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 0.0, "v2": 0.3010299956639812, "v3": -Infinity, "v4": -0.3010299956639812, "v5": 3.0 }
    

power

  • Syntax:

    power(numeric_value1, numeric_value2)
    
  • Computes numeric_value1numeric_value2.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value1: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value,
    • numeric_value2: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • numeric_value1numeric_value2,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": power(1, 2), "v3": power(0, 4), "v4": power(float("0.5"), double("-0.5")) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 1, "v3": 0, "v4": 1.4142135623730951 }
    

round

  • Syntax:

    round(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes the number with no fractional part that is closest (and also closest to positive infinity) to the argument.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • The rounded value for the given number in the same type as the input argument,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    {
      "v1": round(2013),
      "v2": round(-4036),
      "v3": round(0.8),
      "v4": round(float("-2013.256")),
      "v5": round(double("-2013.893823748327284"))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 2013, "v2": -4036, "v3": 1.0, "v4": -2013.0, "v5": -2014.0 }
    

round_half_to_even

  • Syntax:

    round_half_to_even(numeric_value, [precision])
    
  • Computes the closest numeric value to numeric_value that is a multiple of ten to the power of minus precision. precision is optional and by default value 0 is used.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
    • precision: an optional tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint field representing the number of digits in the fraction of the the result
  • Return Value:
    • The rounded value for the given number in the same type as the input argument,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument is any other non-numeric value,
      • or, the second argument is any other non-tinyint, non-smallint, non-integer, or non-bigint value.
  • Example:

    {
      "v1": round_half_to_even(2013),
      "v2": round_half_to_even(-4036),
      "v3": round_half_to_even(0.8),
      "v4": round_half_to_even(float("-2013.256")),
      "v5": round_half_to_even(double("-2013.893823748327284")),
      "v6": round_half_to_even(double("-2013.893823748327284"), 2),
      "v7": round_half_to_even(2013, 4),
      "v8": round_half_to_even(float("-2013.256"), 5)
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 2013, "v2": -4036, "v3": 1.0, "v4": -2013.0, "v5": -2014.0, "v6": -2013.89, "v7": 2013, "v8": -2013.256 }
    

sign

  • Syntax:

    sign(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes the sign of the argument.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • the sign (a tinyint) of the argument, -1 for negative values, 0 for 0, and 1 for positive values,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": sign(1), "v2": sign(2), "v3": sign(0), "v4": sign(float("0.5")), "v5": sign(double("-1000")) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 1, "v2": 1, "v3": 0, "v4": 1, "v5": -1 }
    

sin

  • Syntax:

    sin(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes the sine value of the argument.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • the double sine value for the argument,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": sin(1), "v2": sin(2), "v3": sin(0), "v4": sin(float("0.5")), "v5": sin(double("1000")) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 0.8414709848078965, "v2": 0.9092974268256817, "v3": 0.0, "v4": 0.479425538604203, "v5": 0.8268795405320025 }
    

sqrt

  • Syntax:

    sqrt(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes the square root of the argument.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • the double square root value for the argument,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": sqrt(1), "v2": sqrt(2), "v3": sqrt(0), "v4": sqrt(float("0.5")), "v5": sqrt(double("1000")) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 1.0, "v2": 1.4142135623730951, "v3": 0.0, "v4": 0.7071067811865476, "v5": 31.622776601683793 }
    

tan

  • Syntax:

    tan(numeric_value)
    
  • Computes the tangent value of the argument.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value.
  • Return Value:
    • the double tangent value for the argument,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": tan(1), "v2": tan(2), "v3": tan(0), "v4": tan(float("0.5")), "v5": tan(double("1000")) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 1.5574077246549023, "v2": -2.185039863261519, "v3": 0.0, "v4": 0.5463024898437905, "v5": 1.4703241557027185 }
    

trunc

  • Syntax:

    trunc(numeric_value, number_digits)
    
  • Truncates the number to the given number of integer digits to the right of the decimal point (left if digits is negative). Digits is 0 if not given.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value,
    • number_digits: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint value.
  • Return Value:
    • the double tangent value for the argument,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is missing,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument is any other non-numeric value,
      • the second argument is any other non-tinyint, non-smallint, non-integer, and non-bigint value.
  • Example:

    { "v1": trunc(1, 1), "v2": trunc(2, -2), "v3": trunc(0.122, 2), "v4": trunc(float("11.52"), -1), "v5": trunc(double("1000.5252"), 3) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 1, "v2": 2, "v3": 0.12, "v4": 10.0, "v5": 1000.525 }
    

String Functions

concat

  • Syntax:

    concat(string1, string2, ...)
    
  • Returns a concatenated string from arguments.

  • Arguments:
    • string1: a string value,
    • string2: a string value,
    • ….
  • Return Value:
    • a concatenated string from arguments,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    concat("test ", "driven ", "development");
    
  • The expected result is:

    "test driven development"
    

contains

  • Syntax:

    contains(string, substring_to_contain)
    
  • Checks whether the string string contains the string substring_to_contain

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string that might contain the given substring,
    • substring_to_contain : a target string that might be contained.
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean value, true if string contains substring_to_contain,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error,
    • false otherwise.
  • Note: an n_gram index can be utilized for this function.

  • Example:

    { "v1": contains("I like x-phone", "phone"), "v2": contains("one", "phone") };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": true, "v2": false }
    

ends_with

  • Syntax:

    ends_with(string, substring_to_end_with)
    
  • Checks whether the string string ends with the string substring_to_end_with.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string that might end with the given string,
    • substring_to_end_with : a string that might be contained as the ending substring.
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean value, true if string contains substring_to_contain,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error,
    • false otherwise.
  • Example:

    {
      "v1": ends_with(" love product-b its shortcut_menu is awesome:)", ":)"),
      "v2": ends_with(" awsome:)", ":-)")
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": true, "v2": false }
    

initcap (or title)

  • Syntax:

    initcap(string)
    
  • Converts a given string string so that the first letter of each word is uppercase and every other letter is lowercase. The function has an alias called “title”.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string to be converted.
  • Return Value:
    • a string as the title form of the given string,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": initcap("ASTERIXDB is here!"), "v2": title("ASTERIXDB is here!") };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": "Asterixdb Is Here!", "v2": "Asterixdb Is Here!" }
    

length

  • Syntax:

    length(string)
    
  • Returns the length of the string string.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string or null that represents the string to be checked.
  • Return Value:
    • an bigint that represents the length of string,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    length("test string");
    
  • The expected result is:

    11
    

lower

  • Syntax:

    lower(string)
    
  • Converts a given string string to its lowercase form.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string to be converted.
  • Return Value:
    • a string as the lowercase form of the given string,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    lower("ASTERIXDB");
    
  • The expected result is:

    "asterixdb"
    

ltrim

  • Syntax:

    ltrim(string[, chars]);
    
  • Returns a new string with all leading characters that appear in chars removed. By default, white space is the character to trim.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string to be trimmed,
    • chars : a string that contains characters that are used to trim.
  • Return Value:
    • a trimmed, new string,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    ltrim("me like x-phone", "eml");
    
  • The expected result is:

    " like x-phone"
    

position

  • Syntax:

    position(string, string_pattern)
    
  • Returns the first position of string_pattern within string.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string that might contain the pattern,
    • string_pattern : a pattern string to be matched.
  • Return Value:
    • the first position that string_pattern appears within string, or -1 if it does not appear,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    {
      "v1": position("ppphonepp", "phone"),
      "v2": position("hone", "phone")
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 2, "v2": -1 }
    

regexp_contains

  • Syntax:

    regexp_contains(string, string_pattern[, string_flags])
    
  • Checks whether the strings string contains the regular expression pattern string_pattern (a Java regular expression pattern).

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string that might contain the pattern,
    • string_pattern : a pattern string to be matched,
    • string_flag : (Optional) a string with flags to be used during regular expression matching.
      • The following modes are enabled with these flags: dotall (s), multiline (m), case_insensitive (i), and comments and whitespace (x).
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean, returns true if string contains the pattern string_pattern,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error,
    • false otherwise.
  • Example:

    {
      "v1": regexp_contains("pphonepp", "p*hone"),
      "v2": regexp_contains("hone", "p+hone")
    }
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": true, "v2": false }
    

regexp_like

  • Syntax:

    regexp_like(string, string_pattern[, string_flags])
    
  • Checks whether the string string exactly matches the regular expression pattern string_pattern (a Java regular expression pattern).

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string that might contain the pattern,
    • string_pattern : a pattern string that might be contained,
    • string_flag : (Optional) a string with flags to be used during regular expression matching.
      • The following modes are enabled with these flags: dotall (s), multiline (m), case_insensitive (i), and comments and whitespace (x).
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean value, true if string contains the pattern string_pattern,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error,
    • false otherwise.
  • Example:

    {
      "v1": regexp_like(" can't stand acast the network is horrible:(", ".*acast.*"),
      "v2": regexp_like("acast", ".*acst.*")
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": true, "v2": false }
    

regexp_position

  • Syntax:

    regexp_position(string, string_pattern[, string_flags])
    
  • Returns first position of the regular expression string_pattern (a Java regular expression pattern) within string.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string that might contain the pattern,
    • string_pattern : a pattern string to be matched,
    • string_flag : (Optional) a string with flags to be used during regular expression matching.
      • The following modes are enabled with these flags: dotall (s), multiline (m), case_insensitive (i), and comments and whitespace (x).
  • Return Value:
    • the first position that the regular expression string_pattern appears in string, or -1 if it does not appear.
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    {
      "v1": regexp_position("pphonepp", "p*hone"),
      "v2": regexp_position("hone", "p+hone")
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 0, "v2": -1 }
    

regexp_replace

  • Syntax:

    regexp_replace(string, string_pattern, string_replacement[, string_flags])
    
  • Checks whether the string string matches the given regular expression pattern string_pattern (a Java regular expression pattern), and replace the matched pattern string_pattern with the new pattern string_replacement.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string that might contain the pattern,
    • string_pattern : a pattern string to be matched,
    • string_replacement : a pattern string to be used as the replacement,
    • string_flag : (Optional) a string with flags to be used during replace.
      • The following modes are enabled with these flags: dotall (s), multiline (m), case_insensitive (i), and comments and whitespace (x).
  • Return Value:
    • Returns a string that is obtained after the replacements,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value.
  • Example:

    regexp_replace(" like x-phone the voicemail_service is awesome", " like x-phone", "like product-a")
    
  • The expected result is:

    "like product-a the voicemail_service is awesome"
    

repeat

  • Syntax:

    repeat(string, n)
    
  • Returns a string formed by repeating the input string n times.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string to be repeated,
    • offset : an tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint value as the starting offset of the substring in string.
  • Return Value:
    • a string that repeats the input string n times,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument is any other non-string value,
      • or, the second argument is not a tinyint, smallint, integer, or bigint.
  • Example:

    repeat("test", 3);
    
  • The expected result is:

    "testtesttest"
    

rtrim

  • Syntax:

    rtrim(string[, chars]);
    
  • Returns a new string with all trailing characters that appear in chars removed. By default, white space is the character to trim.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string to be trimmed,
    • chars : a string that contains characters that are used to trim.
  • Return Value:
    • a trimmed, new string,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    {
      "v1": rtrim("i like x-phone", "x-phone"),
      "v2": rtrim("i like x-phone", "onexph")
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": "i like ", "v2": "i like " }
    

split

  • Syntax:

    split(string, sep)
    
  • Splits the input string into an array of substrings separated by the string sep.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string to be split.
  • Return Value:
    • an array of substrings by splitting the input string by sep,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    split("test driven development", " ");
    
  • The expected result is:

    [ "test", "driven", "development" ]
    

starts_with

  • Syntax:

    starts_with(string, substring_to_start_with)
    
  • Checks whether the string string starts with the string substring_to_start_with.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string that might start with the given string.
    • substring_to_start_with : a string that might be contained as the starting substring.
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean, returns true if string starts with the string substring_to_start_with,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error,
    • false otherwise.
  • Example:

    {
      "v1" : starts_with(" like the plan, amazing", " like"),
      "v2" : starts_with("I like the plan, amazing", " like")
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": true, "v2": false }
    

string_concat

  • Syntax:

    string_concat(array)
    
  • Concatenates an array of strings array into a single string.

  • Arguments:
    • array : an array or multiset of strings (could be null or missing) to be concatenated.
  • Return Value:
    • the concatenated string value,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • missing if any element in the input array is missing,
    • null if any element in the input array is null but no element in the input array is missing,
    • any other non-array input value or non-integer element in the input array will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    string_concat(["ASTERIX", " ", "ROCKS!"]);
    
  • The expected result is:

    "ASTERIX ROCKS!"
    

string_join

  • Syntax:

    string_join(array, string)
    
  • Joins an array or multiset of strings array with the given separator string into a single string.

  • Arguments:
    • array : an array or multiset of strings (could be null) to be joined.
    • string : a string to serve as the separator.
  • Return Value:
    • the joined string,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • missing if the first argument array contains a missing,
    • null if the first argument array contains a null but does not contain a missing,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument is any other non-array value, or contains any other non-string value,
      • or, the second argument is any other non-string value.
  • Example:

    string_join(["ASTERIX", "ROCKS~"], "!! ");
    
  • The expected result is:

    "ASTERIX!! ROCKS~"
    

string_to_codepoint

  • Syntax:

    string_to_codepoint(string)
    
  • Converts the string string to its code_based representation.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string that will be converted.
  • Return Value:
    • an array of the code points for the string string,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    string_to_codepoint("Hello ASTERIX!");
    
  • The expected result is:

    [ 72, 101, 108, 108, 111, 32, 65, 83, 84, 69, 82, 73, 88, 33 ]
    

codepoint_to_string

  • Syntax:

    codepoint_to_string(array)
    
  • Converts the ordered code_based representation array to the corresponding string.

  • Arguments:
    • array : an array of integer code_points.
  • Return Value:
    • a string representation of array.
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • missing if any element in the input array is missing,
    • null if any element in the input array is null but no element in the input array is missing,
    • any other non-array input value or non-integer element in the input array will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    codepoint_to_string([72, 101, 108, 108, 111, 32, 65, 83, 84, 69, 82, 73, 88, 33]);
    
  • The expected result is:

    "Hello ASTERIX!"
    

substr

  • Syntax:

    substr(string, offset[, length])
    
  • Returns the substring from the given string string based on the given start offset offset with the optional length.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string to be extracted,
    • offset : an tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint value as the starting offset of the substring in string,
    • length : (Optional) an an tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint value as the length of the substring.
  • Return Value:
    • a string that represents the substring,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument is any other non-string value,
      • or, the second argument is not a tinyint, smallint, integer, or bigint,
      • or, the third argument is not a tinyint, smallint, integer, or bigint if the argument is present.
  • Example:

    substr("test string", 6, 3);
    
  • The expected result is:

    "str"
    

substring_before

  • Syntax:

    substring_before(string, string_pattern)
    
  • Returns the substring from the given string string before the given pattern string_pattern.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string to be extracted.
    • string_pattern : a string pattern to be searched.
  • Return Value:
    • a string that represents the substring,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    substring_before(" like x-phone", "x-phone");
    
  • The expected result is:

    " like "
    

substring_after

  • Syntax:

    substring_after(string, string_pattern);

  • Returns the substring from the given string string after the given pattern string_pattern.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string to be extracted.
    • string_pattern : a string pattern to be searched.
  • Return Value:
    • a string that represents the substring,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    substring_after(" like x-phone", "xph");
    
  • The expected result is:

    "one"
    

trim

  • Syntax:

    trim(string[, chars]);
    
  • Returns a new string with all leading characters that appear in chars removed. By default, white space is the character to trim.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string to be trimmed,
    • chars : a string that contains characters that are used to trim.
  • Return Value:
    • a trimmed, new string,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    trim("i like x-phone", "xphoen");
    
  • The expected result is:

    " like "
    

upper

  • Syntax:

    upper(string)
    
  • Converts a given string string to its uppercase form.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string to be converted.
  • Return Value:
    • a string as the uppercase form of the given string,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    upper("hello")
    
  • The expected result is:

    "HELLO"
    

Binary Functions

parse_binary

  • Syntax:

    parse_binary(string, encoding)

  • Creates a binary from an string encoded in encoding format.

  • Arguments:
    • string : an encoded string,
    • encoding : a string notation specifies the encoding type of the given string. Currently we support hex and base64 format.
  • Return Value:
    • a binary that is decoded from the given string,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    [ parse_binary(“ABCDEF0123456789”,“hex”), parse_binary(“abcdef0123456789”,“HEX”), parse_binary(‘QXN0ZXJpeAE=’,“base64”) ];

  • The expected result is:

    [ hex(“ABCDEF0123456789”), hex(“ABCDEF0123456789”), hex(“4173746572697801”) ]

print_binary

  • Syntax:

    print_binary(binary, encoding)

  • Prints a binary to the required encoding string format.

  • Arguments:
    • binary : a binary data need to be printed.
    • encoding : a string notation specifies the expected encoding type. Currently we support hex and base64 format.
  • Return Value:
    • a string that represents the encoded format of a binary,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    [ print_binary(hex("ABCDEF0123456789"), "base64"), print_binary(base64("q83vASNFZ4k="), "hex") ]
    
  • The expected result are:

    [ "q83vASNFZ4k=", "ABCDEF0123456789" ]
    

binary_length

  • Syntax:

    binary_length(binary)

  • Returns the number of bytes storing the binary data.

  • Arguments:
    • binary : a binary value to be checked.
  • Return Value:
    • an bigint that represents the number of bytes,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-binary input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    binary_length(hex("00AA"))
    
  • The expected result is:

    2

sub_binary

  • Syntax:

    sub_binary(binary, offset[, length])

  • Returns the sub binary from the given binary based on the given start offset with the optional length.

  • Arguments:
    • binary : a binary to be extracted,
    • offset : a tinyint, smallint, integer, or bigint value as the starting offset of the sub binary in binary,
    • length : (Optional) a tinyint, smallint, integer, or bigint value as the length of the sub binary.
  • Return Value:
    • a binary that represents the sub binary,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument is any other non-binary value,
      • or, the second argument is any other non-integer value,
      • or, the third argument is any other non-integer value, if it is present.
  • Example:

    sub_binary(hex("AABBCCDD"), 4);
    
  • The expected result is

    hex("DD")
    

binary_concat

  • Syntax:

    binary_concat(array)

  • Concatenates a binary array or multiset into a single binary.

  • Arguments:
    • array : an array or multiset of binaries (could be null or missing) to be concatenated.
  • Return Value :
    • the concatenated binary value,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • missing if any element in the input array is missing,
    • null if any element in the input array is null but no element in the input array is missing,
    • any other non-array input value or non-binary element in the input array will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    binary_concat([hex(“42”), hex(""), hex(‘42’)]);

  • The expected result is

    hex(“4242”)

Spatial Functions

create_point

  • Syntax:

    create_point(x, y)
    
  • Creates the primitive type point using an x and y value.

  • Arguments:
  • x : a double that represents the x-coordinate,
  • y : a double that represents the y-coordinate.
  • Return Value:
  • a point representing the ordered pair (x, y),
  • missing if any argument is a missing value,
  • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
  • any other non-double input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "point": create_point(30.0,70.0) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "point": point("30.0,70.0") }
    

create_line

  • Syntax:

    create_line(point1, point2)
    
  • Creates the primitive type line using point1 and point2.

  • Arguments:
    • point1 : a point that represents the start point of the line.
    • point2 : a point that represents the end point of the line.
  • Return Value:
    • a spatial line created using the points provided in point1 and point2,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-point input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "line": create_line(create_point(30.0,70.0), create_point(50.0,90.0)) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "line": line("30.0,70.0 50.0,90.0") }
    

create_rectangle

  • Syntax:

    create_rectangle(point1, point2)
    
  • Creates the primitive type rectangle using point1 and point2.

  • Arguments:
    • point1 : a point that represents the lower_left point of the rectangle.
    • point2 : a point that represents the upper_right point of the rectangle.
  • Return Value:
    • a spatial rectangle created using the points provided in point1 and point2,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-point input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "rectangle": create_rectangle(create_point(30.0,70.0), create_point(50.0,90.0)) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "rectangle": rectangle("30.0,70.0 50.0,90.0") }
    

create_circle

  • Syntax:

    create_circle(point, radius)
    
  • Creates the primitive type circle using point and radius.

  • Arguments:
    • point : a point that represents the center of the circle.
    • radius : a double that represents the radius of the circle.
  • Return Value:
    • a spatial circle created using the center point and the radius provided in point and radius.
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument is any other non-point value,
      • or, the second argument is any other non-double value.
  • Example:

    { "circle": create_circle(create_point(30.0,70.0), 5.0) }
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "circle": circle("30.0,70.0 5.0") }
    

create_polygon

  • Syntax:

    create_polygon(array)
    
  • Creates the primitive type polygon using the double values provided in the argument array. Each two consecutive double values represent a point starting from the first double value in the array. Note that at least six double values should be specified, meaning a total of three points.

  • Arguments:
    • array : an array of doubles representing the points of the polygon.
  • Return Value:
    • a polygon, represents a spatial simple polygon created using the points provided in array.
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • missing if any element in the input array is missing,
    • null if any element in the input array is null but no element in the input array is missing,
    • any other non-array input value or non-double element in the input array will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "polygon": create_polygon([1.0,1.0,2.0,2.0,3.0,3.0,4.0,4.0]) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "polygon": polygon("1.0,1.0 2.0,2.0 3.0,3.0 4.0,4.0") }
    

get_x/get_y

  • Syntax:

    get_x(point) or get_y(point)
    
  • Returns the x or y coordinates of a point point.

  • Arguments:
    • point : a point.
  • Return Value:
    • a double representing the x or y coordinates of the point point,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-point input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "x_coordinate": get_x(create_point(2.3,5.0)), "y_coordinate": get_y(create_point(2.3,5.0)) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "x_coordinate": 2.3, "y_coordinate": 5.0 }
    

get_points

  • Syntax:

    get_points(spatial_object)
    
  • Returns an ordered array of the points forming the spatial object spatial_object.

  • Arguments:
    • spatial_object : a point, line, rectangle, circle, or polygon.
  • Return Value:
    • an array of the points forming the spatial object spatial_object,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-spatial-object input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    get_points(create_polygon([1.0,1.0,2.0,2.0,3.0,3.0,4.0,4.0]))
    
  • The expected result is:

    [ point("1.0,1.0"), point("2.0,2.0"), point("3.0,3.0"), point("4.0,4.0") ]
    

get_center/get_radius

  • Syntax:

    get_center(circle_expression) or get_radius(circle_expression)
    
  • Returns the center and the radius of a circle circle_expression, respectively.

  • Arguments:
    • circle_expression : a circle.
  • Return Value:
    • a point or double, represent the center or radius of the circle circle_expression.
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-circle input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    {
      "circle_radius": get_radius(create_circle(create_point(6.0,3.0), 1.0)),
      "circle_center": get_center(create_circle(create_point(6.0,3.0), 1.0))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "circle_radius": 1.0, "circle_center": point("6.0,3.0") }
    

spatial_distance

  • Syntax:

    spatial_distance(point1, point2)
    
  • Returns the Euclidean distance between point1 and point2.

  • Arguments:
    • point1 : a point.
    • point2 : a point.
  • Return Value:
    • a double as the Euclidean distance between point1 and point2.
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-point input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    spatial_distance(point("47.44,80.65"), create_point(30.0,70.0));
    
  • The expected result is:

    20.434678857275934
    

spatial_area

  • Syntax:

    spatial_area(spatial_2d_expression)
    
  • Returns the spatial area of spatial_2d_expression.

  • Arguments:
    • spatial_2d_expression : a rectangle, circle, or polygon.
  • Return Value:
    • a double representing the area of spatial_2d_expression.
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-2d-spatial-object will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    spatial_area(create_circle(create_point(0.0,0.0), 5.0));
    
  • The expected result is:

    78.53981625
    

spatial_intersect

  • Syntax:

    spatial_intersect(spatial_object1, spatial_object2)
    
  • Checks whether @arg1 and @arg2 spatially intersect each other.

  • Arguments:
    • spatial_object1 : a point, line, rectangle, circle, or polygon.
    • spatial_object2 : a point, line, rectangle, circle, or polygon.
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean representing whether spatial_object1 and spatial_object2 spatially overlap with each other,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-spatial-object input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    spatial_intersect(point("39.28,70.48"), create_rectangle(create_point(30.0,70.0), create_point(40.0,80.0)));
    
  • The expected result is:

    true
    

spatial_cell

  • Syntax:

    spatial_cell(point1, point2, x_increment, y_increment)
    
  • Returns the grid cell that point1 belongs to.

  • Arguments:
    • point1 : a point representing the point of interest that its grid cell will be returned.
    • point2 : a point representing the origin of the grid.
    • x_increment : a double, represents X increments.
    • y_increment : a double, represents Y increments.
  • Return Value:
    • a rectangle representing the grid cell that point1 belongs to,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first or second argument is any other non-point value,
      • or, the second or third argument is any other non-double value.
  • Example:

    spatial_cell(point("39.28,70.48"), create_point(20.0,50.0), 5.5, 6.0);
    
  • The expected result is:

    rectangle("36.5,68.0 42.0,74.0");
    

Similarity Functions

AsterixDB supports queries with different similarity functions, including edit distance and Jaccard.

edit_distance

  • Syntax:

    edit_distance(expression1, expression2)
    
  • Returns the edit distance of expression1 and expression2.

  • Arguments:
    • expression1 : a string or a homogeneous array of a comparable item type.
    • expression2 : The same type as expression1.
  • Return Value:
    • an bigint that represents the edit distance between expression1 and expression2,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Note: an n_gram index can be utilized for this function.
  • Example:

    edit_distance("SuzannaTillson", "Suzanna Tilson");
    
  • The expected result is:

    2
    

edit_distance_check

  • Syntax:

    edit_distance_check(expression1, expression2, threshold)
    
  • Checks whether the edit distance of expression1 and expression2 is within a given threshold.

  • Arguments:

    • expression1 : a string or a homogeneous array of a comparable item type.
    • expression2 : The same type as expression1.
    • threshold : a bigint that represents the distance threshold.
  • Return Value:
    • an array with two items:
      • The first item contains a boolean value representing whether the edit distance of expression1 and expression2 is within the given threshold.
      • The second item contains an integer that represents the edit distance of expression1 and expression2 if the first item is true.
      • If the first item is false, then the second item is set to 2147483647.
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first or second argument is any other non-string value,
      • or, the third argument is any other non-bigint value.
  • Note: an n_gram index can be utilized for this function.
  • Example:

    edit_distance_check("happy","hapr",2);
    
  • The expected result is:

    [ true, 2 ]
    

edit_distance_contains

  • Syntax:

    edit_distance_contains(expression1, expression2, threshold)
    
  • Checks whether expression1 contains expression2 with an edit distance within a given threshold.

  • Arguments:

    • expression1 : a string or a homogeneous array of a comparable item type.
    • expression2 : The same type as expression1.
    • threshold : a bigint that represents the distance threshold.
  • Return Value:
    • an array with two items:
      • The first item contains a boolean value representing whether expression1 can contain expression2.
      • The second item contains an integer that represents the required edit distance for expression1 to contain expression2 if the first item is true.
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first or second argument is any other non-string value,
      • or, the third argument is any other non-bigint value.
  • Note: an n_gram index can be utilized for this function.
  • Example:

    edit_distance_contains("happy","hapr",2);
    
  • The expected result is:

    [ true, 1 ]
    

similarity_jaccard

  • Syntax:

    similarity_jaccard(array1, array2)
    
  • Returns the Jaccard similarity of array1 and array2.

  • Arguments:
    • array1 : an array or multiset.
    • array2 : an array or multiset.
  • Return Value:
    • a float that represents the Jaccard similarity of array1 and array2,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • missing if any element in any input array is missing,
    • null if any element in any input array is null but no element in the input array is missing,
    • any other non-array input value or non-integer element in any input array will cause a type error.
  • Note: a keyword index can be utilized for this function.

  • Example:

    similarity_jaccard([1,5,8,9], [1,5,9,10]);
    
  • The expected result is:

    0.6
    

similarity_jaccard_check

  • Syntax:

    similarity_jaccard_check(array1, array2, threshold)
    
  • Checks whether array1 and array2 have a Jaccard similarity greater than or equal to threshold. Again, the “check” version of Jaccard is faster than the “non_check” version.

  • Arguments:

    • array1 : an array or multiset.
    • array2 : an array or multiset.
    • threshold : a double that represents the similarity threshold.
  • Return Value:
    • an array with two items:
      • The first item contains a boolean value representing whether array1 and array2 are similar.
      • The second item contains a float that represents the Jaccard similarity of array1 and array2 if it is greater than or equal to the threshold, or 0 otherwise.
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • missing if any element in any input array is missing,
    • null if any element in any input array is null but no element in the input array is missing,
    • a type error will be raised if: * the first or second argument is any other non-array value, * or, the third argument is any other non-double value.
  • Note: a keyword index can be utilized for this function.

  • Example:

    similarity_jaccard_check([1,5,8,9], [1,5,9,10], 0.6);
    
  • The expected result is:

    [ false, 0.0 ]
    

Tokenizing Functions

word_tokens

  • Syntax:

    word_tokens(string)
    
  • Returns an array of word tokens of string using non_alphanumeric characters as delimiters.

  • Arguments:
    • string : a string that will be tokenized.
  • Return Value:
    • an array of string word tokens,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-string input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    word_tokens("I like the phone, awesome!");
    
  • The expected result is:

    [ "i", "like", "the", "phone", "awesome" ]
    

Temporal Functions

get_year/get_month/get_day/get_hour/get_minute/get_second/get_millisecond

  • Syntax:

    get_year/get_month/get_day/get_hour/get_minute/get_second/get_millisecond(temporal_value)
    
  • Accessors for accessing fields in a temporal value

  • Arguments:
    • temporal_value : a temporal value represented as one of the following types: date, datetime, time, and duration.
  • Return Value:
    • an bigint value representing the field to be extracted,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-interval input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    {
      "year": get_year(date("2010-10-30")),
      "month": get_month(datetime("1987-11-19T23:49:23.938")),
      "day": get_day(date("2010-10-30")),
      "hour": get_hour(time("12:23:34.930+07:00")),
      "min": get_minute(duration("P3Y73M632DT49H743M3948.94S")),
      "second": get_second(datetime("1987-11-19T23:49:23.938")),
      "ms": get_millisecond(duration("P3Y73M632DT49H743M3948.94S"))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "year": 2010, "month": 11, "day": 30, "hour": 5, "min": 28, "second": 23, "ms": 94 }
    

adjust_datetime_for_timezone

  • Syntax:

    adjust_datetime_for_timezone(datetime, string)
    
  • Adjusts the given datetime datetime by applying the timezone information string.

  • Arguments:
    • datetime : a datetime value to be adjusted.
    • string : a string representing the timezone information.
  • Return Value:
    • a string value representing the new datetime after being adjusted by the timezone information,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument is any other non-datetime value,
      • or, the second argument is any other non-string value.
  • Example:

    adjust_datetime_for_timezone(datetime("2008-04-26T10:10:00"), "+08:00");
    
  • The expected result is:

    "2008-04-26T18:10:00.000+08:00"
    

adjust_time_for_timezone

  • Syntax:

    adjust_time_for_timezone(time, string)
    
  • Adjusts the given time time by applying the timezone information string.

  • Arguments:
    • time : a time value to be adjusted.
    • string : a string representing the timezone information.
  • Return Value:
    • a string value representing the new time after being adjusted by the timezone information,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument is any other non-time value,
      • or, the second argument is any other non-string value.
  • Example:

    adjust_time_for_timezone(get_time_from_datetime(datetime("2008-04-26T10:10:00")), "+08:00");
    
  • The expected result is:

    "18:10:00.000+08:00"
    

calendar_duration_from_datetime

  • Syntax:

    calendar_duration_from_datetime(datetime, duration_value)
    
  • Gets a user_friendly representation of the duration duration_value based on the given datetime datetime.

  • Arguments:
    • datetime : a datetime value to be used as the reference time point.
    • duration_value : a duration value to be converted.
  • Return Value:
    • a duration value with the duration as duration_value but with a user_friendly representation,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument is any other non-datetime value,
      • or, the second argument is any other non-duration input value.
  • Example:

    calendar_duration_from_datetime(
          datetime("2016-03-26T10:10:00"),
          datetime("2016-03-26T10:10:00") - datetime("2011-01-01T00:00:00")
    );
    
  • The expected result is:

    duration("P5Y2M24DT10H10M")
    

get_year_month_duration/get_day_time_duration

  • Syntax:

    get_year_month_duration/get_day_time_duration(duration_value)
    
  • Extracts the correct duration subtype from duration_value.

  • Arguments:
    • duration_value : a duration value to be converted.
  • Return Value:
    • a year_month_duration value or a day_time_duration value,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-duration input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    get_year_month_duration(duration("P12M50DT10H"));
    
  • The expected result is:

    year_month_duration("P1Y")
    

months_from_year_month_duration/milliseconds_from_day_time_duration

  • Syntax:

    months_from_year_month_duration/milliseconds_from_day_time_duration(duration_value)
    
  • Extracts the number of months or the number of milliseconds from the duration subtype.

  • Arguments:
    • duration_value : a duration of the correct subtype.
  • Return Value:
    • an bigint representing the number or months/milliseconds,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-duration input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    months_from_year_month_duration(get_year_month_duration(duration("P5Y7MT50M")));
    
  • The expected result is:

    67
    

duration_from_months/duration_from_ms

  • Syntax:

    duration_from_months/duration_from_ms(number_value)
    
  • Creates a duration from number_value.

  • Arguments:
    • number_value : a bigint representing the number of months/milliseconds
  • Return Value:
    • a duration containing number_value value for months/milliseconds,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-duration input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    duration_from_months(8);
    
  • The expected result is:

    duration("P8M")
    

duration_from_interval

  • Syntax:

    duration_from_interval(interval_value)
    
  • Creates a duration from interval_value.

  • Arguments:
    • interval_value : an interval value
  • Return Value:
    • a duration representing the time in the interval_value
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-duration input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    {
      "dr1" : duration_from_interval(interval(date("2010-10-30"), date("2010-12-21"))),
      "dr2" : duration_from_interval(interval(datetime("2012-06-26T01:01:01.111"), datetime("2012-07-27T02:02:02.222"))),
      "dr3" : duration_from_interval(interval(time("12:32:38"), time("20:29:20"))),
      "dr4" : duration_from_interval(null)
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    {
      "dr1": day_time_duration("P52D"),
      "dr2": day_time_duration("P31DT1H1M1.111S"),
      "dr3": day_time_duration("PT7H56M42S"),
      "dr4": null
    }
    

current_date

  • Syntax:

    current_date()
    
  • Gets the current date.

  • Arguments: None
  • Return Value:
    • a date value of the date when the function is called.

current_time

  • Syntax:

    current_time()
    
  • Get the current time

  • Arguments: None
  • Return Value:
    • a time value of the time when the function is called.

current_datetime

  • Syntax:

    current_datetime()
    
  • Get the current datetime

  • Arguments: None
  • Return Value:
    • a datetime value of the datetime when the function is called.

get_date_from_datetime

  • Syntax:

    get_date_from_datetime(datetime)
    
  • Gets the date value from the given datetime value datetime.

  • Arguments:
    • datetime: a datetime value to be extracted from.
  • Return Value:
    • a date value from the datetime,
    • any other non-datetime input value will cause a type error.

get_time_from_datetime

  • Syntax:

    get_time_from_datetime(datetime)
    
  • Get the time value from the given datetime value datetime

  • Arguments:
    • datetime: a datetime value to be extracted from.
  • Return Value:
    • a time value from the datetime.
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-datetime input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    get_time_from_datetime(datetime("2016-03-26T10:10:00"));
    
  • The expected result is:

    time("10:10:00.000Z")
    

day_of_week

  • Syntax:

    day_of_week(date)
    
  • Finds the day of the week for a given date (1_7)

  • Arguments:
    • date: a date value (Can also be a datetime)
  • Return Value:
    • an tinyint representing the day of the week (1_7),
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-date input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    day_of_week(datetime("2012-12-30T12:12:12.039Z"));
    
  • The expected result is:

    7
    

date_from_unix_time_in_days

  • Syntax:

    date_from_unix_time_in_days(numeric_value)
    
  • Gets a date representing the time after numeric_value days since 1970_01_01.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint value representing the number of days.
  • Return Value:
    • a date value as the time after numeric_value days since 1970-01-01,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.

datetime_from_unix_time_in_ms

  • Syntax:

    datetime_from_unix_time_in_ms(numeric_value)
    
  • Gets a datetime representing the time after numeric_value milliseconds since 1970_01_01T00:00:00Z.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint value representing the number of milliseconds.
  • Return Value:
    • a datetime value as the time after numeric_value milliseconds since 1970-01-01T00:00:00Z,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.

datetime_from_unix_time_in_secs

  • Syntax:

    datetime_from_unix_time_in_secs(numeric_value)
    
  • Gets a datetime representing the time after numeric_value seconds since 1970_01_01T00:00:00Z.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint value representing the number of seconds.
  • Return Value:
    • a datetime value as the time after numeric_value seconds since 1970_01_01T00:00:00Z,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.

datetime_from_date_time

  • Syntax:

datetime_from_date_time(date,time)

  • Gets a datetime representing the combination of date and time
    • Arguments:
    • date: a date value
    • time a time value
  • Return Value:
    • a datetime value by combining date and time,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if
      • the first argument is any other non-date value,
      • or, the second argument is any other non-time value.

time_from_unix_time_in_ms

  • Syntax:

    time_from_unix_time_in_ms(numeric_value)
    
  • Gets a time representing the time after numeric_value milliseconds since 00:00:00.000Z.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint value representing the number of milliseconds.
  • Return Value:
    • a time value as the time after numeric_value milliseconds since 00:00:00.000Z,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    {
      "date": date_from_unix_time_in_days(15800),
      "datetime": datetime_from_unix_time_in_ms(1365139700000),
      "time": time_from_unix_time_in_ms(3748)
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "date": date("2013-04-05"), "datetime": datetime("2013-04-05T05:28:20.000Z"), "time": time("00:00:03.748Z") }
    

unix_time_from_date_in_days

  • Syntax:

    unix_time_from_date_in_days(date_value)
    
  • Gets an integer value representing the number of days since 1970_01_01 for date_value.

  • Arguments:
    • date_value: a date value.
  • Return Value:
    • a bigint value representing the number of days,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-date input value will cause a type error.

unix_time_from_datetime_in_ms

  • Syntax:

    unix_time_from_datetime_in_ms(datetime_value)
    
  • Gets an integer value representing the time in milliseconds since 1970_01_01T00:00:00Z for datetime_value.

  • Arguments:
    • datetime_value : a datetime value.
  • Return Value:
    • a bigint value representing the number of milliseconds,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-datetime input value will cause a type error.

unix_time_from_datetime_in_secs

  • Syntax:

    unix_time_from_datetime_in_secs(datetime_value)
    
  • Gets an integer value representing the time in seconds since 1970_01_01T00:00:00Z for datetime_value.

  • Arguments:
    • datetime_value : a datetime value.
  • Return Value:
    • a bigint value representing the number of seconds,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-datetime input value will cause a type error.

unix_time_from_time_in_ms

  • Syntax:

    unix_time_from_time_in_ms(time_value)
    
  • Gets an integer value representing the time the milliseconds since 00:00:00.000Z for time_value.

  • Arguments:
    • time_value : a time value.
  • Return Value:
    • a bigint value representing the number of milliseconds,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-datetime input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    {
      "date": date_from_unix_time_in_days(15800),
      "datetime": datetime_from_unix_time_in_ms(1365139700000),
      "time": time_from_unix_time_in_ms(3748)
    }
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "date": date("2013-04-05"), "datetime": datetime("2013-04-05T05:28:20.000Z"), "time": time("00:00:03.748Z") }
    

parse_date/parse_time/parse_datetime

  • Syntax:

parse_date/parse_time/parse_datetime(date,formatting_expression)

  • Creates a date/time/date_time value by treating date with formatting formatting_expression
  • Arguments:
    • date: a string value representing the date/time/datetime.
    • formatting_expression a string value providing the formatting for date_expression.Characters used to create date expression:
    • h hours
    • m minutes
    • s seconds
    • n milliseconds
    • a am/pm
    • z timezone
    • Y year
    • M month
    • D day
    • W weekday
    • _, ', /, ., ,, T seperators for both time and date
  • Return Value:
    • a date/time/date_time value corresponding to date,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
    • the first argument is any other non-date value,
    • the second argument is any other non-string value.
  • Example:

    parse_time("30:30","m:s");
    
  • The expected result is:

    time("00:30:30.000Z")
    

print_date/print_time/print_datetime

  • Syntax:

    print_date/print_time/print_datetime(date,formatting_expression)
    
  • Creates a string representing a date/time/date_time value of the date using the formatting formatting_expression

  • Arguments:
    • date: a date/time/datetime value.
    • formatting_expression a string value providing the formatting for date_expression. Characters used to create date expression:
    • h hours
    • m minutes
    • s seconds
    • n milliseconds
    • a am/pm
    • z timezone
    • Y year
    • M month
    • D day
    • W weekday
    • _, ', /, ., ,, T seperators for both time and date
  • Return Value:
    • a string value corresponding to date,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument is any other non-date value,
      • the second argument is any other non-string value.
  • Example:

    print_time(time("00:30:30.000Z"),"m:s");
    
  • The expected result is:

    "30:30"
    

get_interval_start, get_interval_end

  • Syntax:

    get_interval_start/get_interval_end(interval)
    
  • Gets the start/end of the given interval.

  • Arguments:
    • interval: the interval to be accessed.
  • Return Value:
    • a time, date, or datetime (depending on the time instances of the interval) representing the starting or ending time,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-interval value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    {
      "start": get_interval_start(interval_start_from_date("1984-01-01", "P1Y")),
      "end": get_interval_end(interval_start_from_date("1984-01-01", "P1Y"))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "start": date("1984_01_01"), "end": date("1985_01_01") }
    

get_interval_start_date/get_interval_start_datetimeget_interval_start_time, get_interval_end_date/get_interval_end_datetime/get_interval_end_time

  • Syntax:

    get_interval_start_date/get_interval_start_datetime/get_interval_start_time/get_interval_end_date/get_interval_end_datetime/get_interval_end_time(interval)
    
  • Gets the start/end of the given interval for the specific date/datetime/time type.

  • Arguments:
    • interval: the interval to be accessed.
  • Return Value:
    • a time, date, or datetime (depending on the function) representing the starting or ending time,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-interval value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    {
      "start1": get_interval_start_date(interval_start_from_date("1984-01-01", "P1Y")),
      "end1": get_interval_end_date(interval_start_from_date("1984-01-01", "P1Y")),
      "start2": get_interval_start_datetime(interval_start_from_datetime("1984-01-01T08:30:00.000", "P1Y1H")),
      "end2": get_interval_end_datetime(interval_start_from_datetime("1984-01-01T08:30:00.000", "P1Y1H")),
      "start3": get_interval_start_time(interval_start_from_time("08:30:00.000", "P1H")),
      "end3": get_interval_end_time(interval_start_from_time("08:30:00.000", "P1H"))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    {
      "start1": date("1984-01-01"),
      "end1": date("1985-01-01"),
      "start2": datetime("1984-01-01T08:30:00.000Z"),
      "end2": datetime("1985-01-01T09:30:00.000Z"),
      "start3": time("08:30:00.000Z"),
      "end3": time("09:30:00.000Z")
    }
    

get_overlapping_interval

  • Syntax:

    get_overlapping_interval(interval1, interval2)
    
  • Gets the start/end of the given interval for the specific date/datetime/time type.

  • Arguments:
    • interval1: an interval value
    • interval2: an interval value
  • Return Value:
    • an interval that is overlapping interval1 and interval2. If interval1 and interval2 do not overlap null is returned. Note each interval must be of the same type.
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-interval input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "overlap1": get_overlapping_interval(interval(time("11:23:39"), time("18:27:19")), interval(time("12:23:39"), time("23:18:00"))),
      "overlap2": get_overlapping_interval(interval(time("12:23:39"), time("18:27:19")), interval(time("07:19:39"), time("09:18:00"))),
      "overlap3": get_overlapping_interval(interval(date("1980-11-30"), date("1999-09-09")), interval(date("2013-01-01"), date("2014-01-01"))),
      "overlap4": get_overlapping_interval(interval(date("1980-11-30"), date("2099-09-09")), interval(date("2013-01-01"), date("2014-01-01"))),
      "overlap5": get_overlapping_interval(interval(datetime("1844-03-03T11:19:39"), datetime("2000-10-30T18:27:19")), interval(datetime("1989-03-04T12:23:39"), datetime("2009-10-10T23:18:00"))),
      "overlap6": get_overlapping_interval(interval(datetime("1989-03-04T12:23:39"), datetime("2000-10-30T18:27:19")), interval(datetime("1844-03-03T11:19:39"), datetime("1888-10-10T23:18:00")))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "overlap1": interval(time("12:23:39.000Z"), time("18:27:19.000Z")),
      "overlap2": null,
      "overlap3": null,
      "overlap4": interval(date("2013-01-01"), date("2014_01_01")),
      "overlap5": interval(datetime("1989-03-04T12:23:39.000Z"), datetime("2000-10-30T18:27:19.000Z")),
      "overlap6": null
    }
    

interval_bin

  • Syntax:

    interval_bin(time_to_bin, time_bin_anchor, duration_bin_size)
    
  • Returns the interval value representing the bin containing the time_to_bin value.

  • Arguments:
    • time_to_bin: a date/time/datetime value representing the time to be binned.
    • time_bin_anchor: a date/time/datetime value representing an anchor of a bin starts. The type of this argument should be the same as the first time_to_bin argument.
    • duration_bin_size: the duration value representing the size of the bin, in the type of year_month_duration or day_time_duration. The type of this duration should be compatible with the type of time_to_bin, so that the arithmetic operation between time_to_bin and duration_bin_size is well_defined. Currently AsterixDB supports the following arithmetic operations:
      • datetime +|_ year_month_duration
      • datetime +|_ day_time_duration
      • date +|_ year_month_duration
      • date +|_ day_time_duration
      • time +|_ day_time_duration
  • Return Value:
    • a interval value representing the bin containing the time_to_bin value. Note that the internal type of this interval value should be the same as the time_to_bin type,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument or the second argument is any other non-date/non-time/non-datetime value,
      • or, the second argument is any other non-year_month_duration/non-day_time_duration value.
  • Example:

    {
      "bin1": interval_bin(date("2010-10-30"), date("1990-01-01"), year_month_duration("P1Y")),
      "bin2": interval_bin(datetime("1987-11-19T23:49:23.938"), datetime("1990-01-01T00:00:00.000Z"), year_month_duration("P6M")),
      "bin3": interval_bin(time("12:23:34.930+07:00"), time("00:00:00"), day_time_duration("PT1M")),
      "bin4": interval_bin(datetime("1987-11-19T23:49:23.938"), datetime("2013-01-01T00:00:00.000"), day_time_duration("PT24H"))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    {
      "bin1": interval(date("2010-01-01"),date("2011-01-01")),
      "bin2": interval(datetime("1987-07-01T00:00:00.000Z"), datetime("1988-01-01T00:00:00.000Z")),
      "bin3": interval(time("05:23:00.000Z"), time("05:24:00.000Z")),
      "bin4": interval(datetime("1987-11-19T00:00:00.000Z"), datetime("1987-11-20T00:00:00.000Z"))
    }
    

interval_start_from_date/time/datetime

  • Syntax:

    interval_start_from_date/time/datetime(date/time/datetime, duration)
    
  • Construct an interval value by the given starting date/time/datetime and the duration that the interval lasts.

  • Arguments:
    • date/time/datetime: a string representing a date, time or datetime, or a date/time/datetime value, representing the starting time point.
    • duration: a string or duration value representing the duration of the interval. Note that duration cannot be negative value.
  • Return Value:
    • an interval value representing the interval starting from the given time point with the length of duration,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument or the second argument is any other non-date/non-time/non-datetime value,
      • or, the second argument is any other non-duration value.
  • Example:

    {
      "interval1": interval_start_from_date("1984-01-01", "P1Y"),
      "interval2": interval_start_from_time(time("02:23:28.394"), "PT3H24M"),
      "interval3": interval_start_from_datetime("1999-09-09T09:09:09.999", duration("P2M30D"))
    };
    
  • The expectecd result is:

    {
      "interval1": interval(date("1984-01-01"), date("1985-01-01")),
      "interval2": interval(time("02:23:28.394Z"), time("05:47:28.394Z")),
      "interval3": interval(datetime("1999-09-09T09:09:09.999Z"), datetime("1999-12-09T09:09:09.999Z"))
    }
    

overlap_bins

  • Return Value:

    • a interval value representing the bin containing the time_to_bin value. Note that the internal type of this interval value should be the same as the time_to_bin type.
  • Syntax:

    overlap_bins(interval, time_bin_anchor, duration_bin_size)
    
  • Returns an ordered list of interval values representing each bin that is overlapping the interval.

  • Arguments:
    • interval: an interval value
    • time_bin_anchor: a date/time/datetime value representing an anchor of a bin starts. The type of this argument should be the same as the first time_to_bin argument.
    • duration_bin_size: the duration value representing the size of the bin, in the type of year_month_duration or day_time_duration. The type of this duration should be compatible with the type of time_to_bin, so that the arithmetic operation between time_to_bin and duration_bin_size is well_defined. Currently AsterixDB supports the following arithmetic operations:
      • datetime +|_ year_month_duration
      • datetime +|_ day_time_duration
      • date +|_ year_month_duration
      • date +|_ day_time_duration
      • time +|_ day_time_duration
  • Return Value:
    • a ordered list of interval values representing each bin that is overlapping the interval. Note that the internal type as time_to_bin and duration_bin_size.
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first arugment is any other non-interval value,
      • or, the second argument is any other non-date/non-time/non-datetime value,
      • or, the second argument is any other non-year_month_duration/non-day_time_duration value.
  • Example:

    {
      "timebins": overlap_bins(interval(time("17:23:37"), time("18:30:21")), time("00:00:00"), day_time_duration("PT30M")),
      "datebins": overlap_bins(interval(date("1984-03-17"), date("2013-08-22")), date("1990-01-01"), year_month_duration("P10Y")),
      "datetimebins": overlap_bins(interval(datetime("1800-01-01T23:59:48.938"), datetime("2015-07-26T13:28:30.218")),
                                  datetime("1900-01-01T00:00:00.000"), year_month_duration("P100Y"))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    {
      "timebins": [
                    interval(time("17:00:00.000Z"), time("17:30:00.000Z")),
                    interval(time("17:30:00.000Z"), time("18:00:00.000Z")),
                    interval(time("18:00:00.000Z"), time("18:30:00.000Z")),
                    interval(time("18:30:00.000Z"), time("19:00:00.000Z"))
                  ],
      "datebins": [
                    interval(date("1980-01-01"), date("1990-01-01")),
                    interval(date("1990-01-01"), date("2000-01-01")),
                    interval(date("2000-01-01"), date("2010-01-01")),
                    interval(date("2010-01-01"), date("2020-01-01"))
                  ],
      "datetimebins": [
                        interval(datetime("1800-01-01T00:00:00.000Z"), datetime("1900-01-01T00:00:00.000Z")),
                        interval(datetime("1900-01-01T00:00:00.000Z"), datetime("2000-01-01T00:00:00.000Z")),
                        interval(datetime("2000-01-01T00:00:00.000Z"), datetime("2100-01-01T00:00:00.000Z"))
                       ]
    };
    

interval_before, interval_after

  • Syntax:

    interval_before(interval1, interval2)
    interval_after(interval1, interval2)
    
  • These two functions check whether an interval happens before/after another interval.

  • Arguments:
    • interval1, interval2: two intervals to be compared
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean value. Specifically, interval_before(interval1, interval2) is true if and only if interval1.end < interval2.start, and interval_after(interval1, interval2) is true if and only if interval1.start > interval2.end.
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-interval input value will cause a type error.
  • Examples:

    {
      "interval_before": interval_before(interval(date("2000-01-01"), date("2005-01-01")),
                                         interval(date("2005-05-01"), date("2012-09-09"))),
      "interval_after": interval_after(interval(date("2005-05-01"), date("2012-09-09")),
                                       interval(date("2000-01-01"), date("2005-01-01")))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "interval_before": true, "interval_after": true }
    

interval_covers, interval_covered_by

  • Syntax:

    interval_covers(interval1, interval2)
    interval_covered_by(interval1, interval2)
    
  • These two functions check whether one interval covers the other interval.

  • Arguments:
    • interval1, interval2: two intervals to be compared
  • Return Value:

    • a boolean value. Specifically, interval_covers(interval1, interval2) is true if and only if
    interval1.start <= interval2.start AND interval1.end >= interval2.end
    
    `interval_covered_by(interval1, interval2)` is true if and only if
    
    interval2.start <= interval1.start AND interval2.end >= interval1.end
    
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-interval input value will cause a type error.
  • Examples:

    {
      "interval_covers": interval_covers(interval(date("2000-01-01"), date("2005-01-01")),
                                         interval(date("2000-03-01"), date("2004-09-09"))),
      "interval_covered_by": interval_covered_by(interval(date("2006-08-01"), date("2007-03-01")),
                                                 interval(date("2004-09-10"), date("2012-08-01")))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "interval_covers": true, "interval_covered_by": true }
    

interval_overlaps, interval_overlapped_by

  • Syntax:

    interval_overlaps(interval1, interval2)
    interval_overlapped_by(interval1, interval2)
    
  • These functions check whether two intervals overlap with each other.

  • Arguments:
    • interval1, interval2: two intervals to be compared
  • Return Value:

    • a boolean value. Specifically, interval_overlaps(interval1, interval2) is true if and only if
    interval1.start < interval2.start
    AND interval2.end > interval1.end
    AND interval1.end > interval2.start
    

    interval_overlapped_by(interval1, interval2) is true if and only if

    interval2.start < interval1.start
    AND interval1.end > interval2.end
    AND interval2.end > interval1.start
    
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-interval input value will cause a type error.

    Note that interval_overlaps and interval_overlapped_by are following the Allen’s relations on the definition of overlap.

  • Examples:

    {
      "overlaps": interval_overlaps(interval(date("2000-01-01"), date("2005-01-01")),
                                    interval(date("2004-05-01"), date("2012-09-09"))),
      "overlapped_by": interval_overlapped_by(interval(date("2006-08-01"), date("2007-03-01")),
                                              interval(date("2004-05-01"), date("2012-09-09"))))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "overlaps": true, "overlapped_by": true }
    

interval_overlapping

Note that interval_overlapping is not an Allen’s Relation, but syntactic sugar we added for the case that the intersect of two intervals is not empty. Basically this function returns true if any of these functions return true: interval_overlaps, interval_overlapped_by, interval_covers, or interval_covered_by.

  • Syntax:

    interval_overlapping(interval1, interval2)
    
  • This functions check whether two intervals share any points with each other.

  • Arguments:
    • interval1, interval2: two intervals to be compared
  • Return Value:

    • a boolean value. Specifically, interval_overlapping(interval1, interval2) is true if
    interval1.start < interval2.end
    AND interval1.end > interval2.start
    
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-interval input value will cause a type error.
  • Examples:

    {
      "overlapping1": interval_overlapping(interval(date("2000-01-01"), date("2005-01-01")),
                                           interval(date("2004-05-01"), date("2012-09-09"))),
      "overlapping2": interval_overlapping(interval(date("2006-08-01"), date("2007-03-01")),
                                           interval(date("2004-09-10"), date("2006-12-31")))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "overlapping1": true, "overlapping2": true }
    

interval_meets, interval_met_by

  • Syntax:

    interval_meets(interval1, interval2)
    interval_met_by(interval1, interval2)
    
  • These two functions check whether an interval meets with another interval.

  • Arguments:
    • interval1, interval2: two intervals to be compared
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean value. Specifically, interval_meets(interval1, interval2) is true if and only if interval1.end = interval2.start, and interval_met_by(interval1, interval2) is true if and only if interval1.start = interval2.end. If any of the two inputs is null, null is returned.
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-interval input value will cause a type error.
  • Examples:

    {
      "meets": interval_meets(interval(date("2000-01-01"), date("2005-01-01")),
                              interval(date("2005-01-01"), date("2012-09-09"))),
      "metby": interval_met_by(interval(date("2006-08-01"), date("2007-03-01")),
                               interval(date("2004-09-10"), date("2006-08-01")))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "meets": true, "metby": true }
    

interval_starts, interval_started_by

  • Syntax:

    interval_starts(interval1, interval2)
    interval_started_by(interval1, interval2)
    
  • These two functions check whether one interval starts with the other interval.

  • Arguments:
    • interval1, interval2: two intervals to be compared
  • Return Value:

    • a boolean value. Specifically, interval_starts(interval1, interval2) returns true if and only if
    interval1.start = interval2.start
    AND interval1.end <= interval2.end
    

    interval_started_by(interval1, interval2) returns true if and only if

    interval1.start = interval2.start
    AND interval2.end <= interval1.end
    
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-interval input value will cause a type error.
  • Examples:

    {
      "interval_starts": interval_starts(interval(date("2000-01-01"), date("2005-01-01")),
                                         interval(date("2000-01-01"), date("2012-09-09"))),
      "interval_started_by": interval_started_by(interval(date("2006-08-01"), date("2007-03-01")),
                                                 interval(date("2006-08-01"), date("2006-08-02")))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "interval_starts": true, "interval_started_by": true }
    

interval_ends, interval_ended_by

  • Syntax:

    interval_ends(interval1, interval2)
    interval_ended_by(interval1, interval2)
    
  • These two functions check whether one interval ends with the other interval.

  • Arguments:
    • interval1, interval2: two intervals to be compared
  • Return Value:

    • a boolean value. Specifically, interval_ends(interval1, interval2) returns true if and only if
    interval1.end = interval2.end
    AND interval1.start >= interval2.start
    
    `interval_ended_by(interval1, interval2)` returns true if and only if
    
    interval2.end = interval1.end
    AND interval2.start >= interval1.start
    
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-interval input value will cause a type error.
  • Examples:

    {
      "interval_ends": interval_ends(interval(date("2000-01-01"), date("2005-01-01")),
                                     interval(date("1998-01-01"), date("2005-01-01"))),
      "interval_ended_by": interval_ended_by(interval(date("2006-08-01"), date("2007-03-01")),
                                             interval(date("2006-09-10"), date("2007-03-01")))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "interval_ends": true, "interval_ended_by": true }
    

Object Functions

get_object_fields

  • Syntax:

    get_object_fields(input_object)
    
  • Access the object field names, type and open status for a given object.

  • Arguments:
    • input_object : a object value.
  • Return Value:
    • an array of object values that include the field_name string, field_type string, is_open boolean (used for debug purposes only: true if field is open and false otherwise), and optional nested orderedList for the values of a nested object,
    • missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • null if the argument is a null value,
    • any other non-object input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    get_object_fields(
                      {
                        "id": 1,
                        "project": "AsterixDB",
                        "address": {"city": "Irvine", "state": "CA"},
                        "related": ["Hivestrix", "Preglix", "Apache VXQuery"]
                      }
                     );
    
  • The expected result is:

    [
      { "field-name": "id", "field-type": "INT64", "is-open": false },
      { "field-name": "project", "field-type": "STRING", "is-open": false },
      { "field-name": "address", "field-type": "RECORD", "is-open": false,
        "nested": [
                    { "field-name": "city", "field-type": "STRING", "is-open": false },
                    { "field-name": "state", "field-type": "STRING", "is-open": false }
                  ]
      },
      { "field-name":
            "related",
            "field-type": "ORDEREDLIST",
            "is-open": false,
            "list": [
                      { "field-type": "STRING" },
                      { "field-type": "STRING" },
                      { "field-type": "STRING" }
                    ]
      }
    ]
    

]

get_object_field_value

  • Syntax:

    get_object_field_value(input_object, string)
    
  • Access the field name given in the string_expression from the object_expression.

  • Arguments:
    • input_object : a object value.
    • string : a string representing the top level field name.
  • Return Value:
    • an any value saved in the designated field of the object,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument is any other non-object value,
      • or, the second argument is any other non-string value.
  • Example:

    get_object_field_value({
                             "id": 1,
                             "project": "AsterixDB",
                             "address": {"city": "Irvine", "state": "CA"},
                             "related": ["Hivestrix", "Preglix", "Apache VXQuery"]
                            },
                            "project"
                           );
    
  • The expected result is:

    "AsterixDB"
    

object_remove_fields

  • Syntax:

    object_remove_fields(input_object, field_names)
    
  • Remove indicated fields from a object given a list of field names.

  • Arguments:
    • input_object: a object value.
    • field_names: an array of strings and/or array of array of strings.
  • Return Value:

    • a new object value without the fields listed in the second argument,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument is any other non-object value,
      • or, the second argument is any other non-array value or recursively contains non-string items.
  • Example:

    object_remove_fields(
                           {
                             "id":1,
                             "project":"AsterixDB",
                             "address":{"city":"Irvine", "state":"CA"},
                             "related":["Hivestrix", "Preglix", "Apache VXQuery"]
                           },
                           [["address", "city"], "related"]
                         );
    
  • The expected result is:

    {
      "id":1,
      "project":"AsterixDB",
      "address":{ "state": "CA" }
    }
    

object_add_fields

  • Syntax:

    object_add_fields(input_object, fields)
    
  • Add fields to a object given a list of field names.

  • Arguments:
    • input_object : a object value.
    • fields: an array of field descriptor objects where each object has field_name and field_value.
  • Return Value:
    • a new object value with the new fields included,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • a type error will be raised if:
      • the first argument is any other non-object value,
      • the second argument is any other non-array value, or contains non-object items.
  • Example:

    object_add_fields(
                       {
                         "id":1,
                         "project":"AsterixDB",
                         "address":{"city":"Irvine", "state":"CA"},
                         "related":["Hivestrix", "Preglix", "Apache VXQuery"]
                        },
                        [{"field-name":"employment_location", "field-value":create_point(30.0,70.0)}]
                      );
    
  • The expected result is:

    {
       "id":1,
       "project":"AsterixDB",
       "address":{"city":"Irvine", "state":"CA"},
       "related":["Hivestrix", "Preglix", "Apache VXQuery"]
       "employment_location": point("30.0,70.0")
     }
    

object_merge

  • Syntax:

    object_merge(object1, object2)
    
  • Merge two different objects into a new object.

  • Arguments:
    • object1 : a object value.
    • object2 : a object value.
  • Return Value:
    • a new object value with fields from both input objects. If a field’s names in both objects are the same, an exception is issued,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • any other non-object input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    object_merge(
                  {
                    "id":1,
                    "project":"AsterixDB",
                    "address":{"city":"Irvine", "state":"CA"},
                    "related":["Hivestrix", "Preglix", "Apache VXQuery"]
                  },
                  {
                    "user_id": 22,
                    "employer": "UC Irvine",
                    "employment_type": "visitor"
                  }
                );
    
  • The expected result is:

    {
      "employment_type": "visitor",
      "address": {
        "city": "Irvine",
        "state": "CA"
      },
      "related": [
        "Hivestrix",
        "Preglix",
        "Apache VXQuery"
      ],
      "user_id": 22,
      "project": "AsterixDB",
      "employer": "UC Irvine",
      "id": 1
    }
    

Aggregate Functions (Array Functions)

A high-level description of SQL++ aggregate functions can be found at here. As SQL++ supports all legitimate SQL GROUP BY and Aggregation queries, here is a description of how standard SQL aggregation functions are supported.

This section contains detailed descriptions of each SQL++ aggregate function (i.e., array function).

array_count

  • Syntax:

    array_count(collection)
    
  • Gets the number of non-null and non-missing items in the given collection.

  • Arguments:
    • collection could be:
      • an array or multiset to be counted,
      • or, a null value,
      • or, a missing value.
  • Return Value:
    • a bigint value representing the number of non-null and non-missing items in the given collection,
    • null is returned if the input is null or missing,
    • any other non-array and non-multiset input value will cause an error.
  • Example:

    array_count( ['hello', 'world', 1, 2, 3, null, missing] );
    
  • The expected result is:

    5
    

array_avg

  • Syntax:

    array_avg(num_collection)
    
  • Gets the average value of the non-null and non-missing numeric items in the given collection.

  • Arguments:
    • num_collection could be:
      • an array or multiset containing numeric values, nulls or missings,
      • or, a null value,
      • or, a missing value.
  • Return Value:
    • a double value representing the average of the non-null and non-missing numbers in the given collection,
    • null is returned if the input is null or missing,
    • null is returned if the given collection does not contain any non-null and non-missing items,
    • any other non-array and non-multiset input value will cause a type error,
    • any other non-numeric value in the input collection will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    array_avg( [1.2, 2.3, 3.4, 0, null] );
    
  • The expected result is:

    1.725
    

array_sum

  • Syntax:

    array_sum(num_collection)
    
  • Gets the sum of non-null and non-missing items in the given collection.

  • Arguments:
    • num_collection could be:
      • an array or multiset containing numeric values, nulls or missings,
      • or, a null value,
      • or, a missing value.
  • Return Value:
    • the sum of the non-null and non-missing numbers in the given collection. The returning type is decided by the item type with the highest order in the numeric type promotion order (tinyint-> smallint->integer->bigint->float->double) among items.
    • null is returned if the input is null or missing,
    • null is returned if the given collection does not contain any non-null and non-missing items,
    • any other non-array and non-multiset input value will cause a type error,
    • any other non-numeric value in the input collection will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    array_sum( [1.2, 2.3, 3.4, 0, null, missing] );
    
  • The expected result is:

    6.9
    

array_sql_min

  • Syntax:

    array_min(num_collection)
    
  • Gets the min value of non-null and non-missing comparable items in the given collection.

  • Arguments:
    • num_collection could be:
      • an array or multiset,
      • or, a null value,
      • or, a missing value.
  • Return Value:
    • the min value of non-null and non-missing values in the given collection. The returning type is decided by the item type with the highest order in the type promotion order (tinyint-> smallint->integer->bigint->float->double) among numeric items.
    • null is returned if the input is null or missing,
    • null is returned if the given collection does not contain any non-null and non-missing items,
    • multiple incomparable items in the input array or multiset will cause a type error,
    • any other non-array and non-multiset input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    array_min( [1.2, 2.3, 3.4, 0, null, missing] );
    
  • The expected result is:

    0.0
    

array_max

  • Syntax:

    array_max(num_collection)
    
  • Gets the max value of the non-null and non-missing comparable items in the given collection.

  • Arguments:
    • num_collection could be:
      • an array or multiset,
      • or, a null value,
      • or, a missing value.
  • Return Value:
    • the max value of non-null and non-missing numbers in the given collection. The returning type is decided by the item type with the highest order in the type promotion order (tinyint-> smallint->integer->bigint->float->double) among numeric items.
    • null is returned if the input is null or missing,
    • null is returned if the given collection does not contain any non-null and non-missing items,
    • multiple incomparable items in the input array or multiset will cause a type error,
    • any other non-array and non-multiset input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    array_max( [1.2, 2.3, 3.4, 0, null, missing] );
    
  • The expected result is:

    3.4
    

coll_count

  • Syntax:

    coll_count(collection)
    
  • Gets the number of items in the given collection.

  • Arguments:
    • collection could be:
      • an array or multiset containing the items to be counted,
      • or a null value,
      • or a missing value.
  • Return Value:
    • a bigint value representing the number of items in the given collection,
    • null is returned if the input is null or missing.
  • Example:

    coll_count( [1, 2, null, missing] );
    
  • The expected result is:

    4
    

coll_avg

  • Syntax:

    coll_avg(num_collection)
    
  • Gets the average value of the numeric items in the given collection.

  • Arguments:
    • num_collection could be:
      • an array or multiset containing numeric values, nulls or missings,
      • or, a null value,
      • or, a missing value.
  • Return Value:
    • a double value representing the average of the numbers in the given collection,
    • null is returned if the input is null or missing,
    • null is returned if there is a null or missing in the input collection,
    • any other non-numeric value in the input collection will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    coll_avg( [100, 200, 300] );
    
  • The expected result is:

    [ 200.0 ]
    

coll_sum

  • Syntax:

    coll_sum(num_collection)
    
  • Gets the sum of the items in the given collection.

  • Arguments:
    • num_collection could be:
      • an array or multiset containing numeric values, nulls or missings,
      • or, a null value,
      • or, a missing value.
  • Return Value:
    • the sum of the numbers in the given collection. The returning type is decided by the item type with the highest order in the numeric type promotion order (tinyint-> smallint->integer->bigint->float->double) among items.
    • null is returned if the input is null or missing,
    • null is returned if there is a null or missing in the input collection,
    • any other non-numeric value in the input collection will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    coll_sum( [100, 200, 300] );
    
  • The expected result is:

    600
    

array_min

  • Syntax:

    coll_min(num_collection)
    
  • Gets the min value of comparable items in the given collection.

  • Arguments:
    • num_collection could be:
      • an array or multiset,
      • or, a null value,
      • or, a missing value.
  • Return Value:
    • the min value of the given collection. The returning type is decided by the item type with the highest order in the type promotion order (tinyint-> smallint->integer->bigint->float->double) among numeric items.
    • null is returned if the input is null or missing,
    • null is returned if there is a null or missing in the input collection,
    • multiple incomparable items in the input array or multiset will cause a type error,
    • any other non-array and non-multiset input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    coll_min( [10.2, 100, 5] );
    
  • The expected result is:

    5.0
    

array_max

  • Syntax:

    coll_max(num_collection)
    
  • Gets the max value of numeric items in the given collection.

  • Arguments:
    • num_collection could be:
      • an array or multiset,
      • or, a null value,
      • or, a missing value.
  • Return Value:
    • The max value of the given collection. The returning type is decided by the item type with the highest order in the type promotion order (tinyint-> smallint->integer->bigint->float->double) among numeric items.
    • null is returned if the input is null or missing,
    • null is returned if there is a null or missing in the input collection,
    • multiple incomparable items in the input array or multiset will cause a type error,
    • any other non-array and non-multiset input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    coll_max( [10.2, 100, 5] );
    
  • The expected result is:

    100.0
    

Comparison Functions

greatest

  • Syntax:

    greatest(numeric_value1, numeric_value2, ...)
    
  • Computes the greatest value among arguments.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value1: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value,
    • numeric_value2: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value,
    • ….
  • Return Value:
    • the greatest values among arguments. The returning type is decided by the item type with the highest order in the numeric type promotion order (tinyint-> smallint->integer->bigint->float->double) among items.
    • null if any argument is a missing value or null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": greatest(1, 2, 3), "v2": greatest(float("0.5"), double("-0.5"), 5000) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 3, "v2": 5000.0 }
    

least

  • Syntax:

    least(numeric_value1, numeric_value2, ...)
    
  • Computes the least value among arguments.

  • Arguments:
    • numeric_value1: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value,
    • numeric_value2: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint/float/double value,
    • ….
  • Return Value:
    • the least values among arguments. The returning type is decided by the item type with the highest order in the numeric type promotion order (tinyint-> smallint->integer->bigint->float->double) among items.
    • null if any argument is a missing value or null value,
    • any other non-numeric input value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": least(1, 2, 3), "v2": least(float("0.5"), double("-0.5"), 5000) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": 1, "v2": -0.5 }
    

Type Functions [Back to TOC]

is_array (isarray)

  • Syntax:

    is_array(expr)
    
  • Checks whether the given expression is evaluated to be an array value.

  • Arguments:
    • expr : an expression (any type is allowed).
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean on whether the argument is an array value or not,
    • a missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • a null if the argument is a null value.
  • Example:

    {
      "a": is_array(true),
      "b": is_array(false),
      "c": isarray(null),
      "d": isarray(missing),
      "e": isarray("d"),
      "f": isarray(4.0),
      "g": isarray(5),
      "h": isarray(["1", 2]),
      "i": isarray({"a":1})
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "a": false, "b": false, "c": null, "e": false, "f": false, "g": false, "h": true, "i": false }
    

The function has an alias isarray.

is_boolean (isboolean, isbool)

  • Syntax:

    is_boolean(expr)
    
  • Checks whether the given expression is evaluated to be a boolean value.

  • Arguments:
    • expr : an expression (any type is allowed).
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean on whether the argument is a boolean value or not,
    • a missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • a null if the argument is a null value.
  • Example:

    {
      "a": isboolean(true),
      "b": isboolean(false),
      "c": is_boolean(null),
      "d": is_boolean(missing),
      "e": isbool("d"),
      "f": isbool(4.0),
      "g": isbool(5),
      "h": isbool(["1", 2]),
      "i": isbool({"a":1})
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "a": true, "b": true, "c": null, "e": false, "f": false, "g": false, "h": false, "i": false }
    

The function has two aliases, isboolean or isbool.

is_number (isnumber, isnum)

  • Syntax:

    is_number(expr)
    
  • Checks whether the given expression is evaluated to be a numeric value.

  • Arguments:
    • expr : an expression (any type is allowed).
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean on whether the argument is a smallint/tinyint/integer/bigint/float/double value or not,
    • a missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • a null if the argument is a null value.
  • Example:

    {
      "a": is_number(true),
      "b": is_number(false),
      "c": isnumber(null),
      "d": isnumber(missing),
      "e": isnumber("d"),
      "f": isnum(4.0),
      "g": isnum(5),
      "h": isnum(["1", 2]),
      "i": isnum({"a":1})
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "a": false, "b": false, "c": null, "e": false, "f": true, "g": true, "h": false, "i": false }
    

The function has two aliases, isnumber or isnum.

is_object (isobject, isobj)

  • Syntax:

    is_object(expr)
    
  • Checks whether the given expression is evaluated to be a object value.

  • Arguments:
    • expr : an expression (any type is allowed).
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean on whether the argument is a object value or not,
    • a missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • a null if the argument is a null value.
  • Example:

    {
      "a": is_object(true),
      "b": is_object(false),
      "c": isobject(null),
      "d": isobject(missing),
      "e": isobj("d"),
      "f": isobj(4.0),
      "g": isobj(5),
      "h": isobj(["1", 2]),
      "i": isobj({"a":1})
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { “a”: false, “b”: false, “c”: null, “e”: false, “f”: false, “g”: false, “h”: false, “i”: true }

The function has two aliases, isobject or isobj.

is_string (isstring, isstr)

  • Syntax:

    is_string(expr)
    
  • Checks whether the given expression is evaluated to be a string value.

  • Arguments:
    • expr : an expression (any type is allowed).
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean on whether the argument is a string value or not,
    • a missing if the argument is a missing value,
    • a null if the argument is a null value.
  • Example:

    {
      "a": is_string(true),
      "b": isstring(false),
      "c": isstring(null),
      "d": isstr(missing),
      "e": isstr("d"),
      "f": isstr(4.0),
      "g": isstr(5),
      "h": isstr(["1", 2]),
      "i": isstr({"a":1})
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "a": false, "b": false, "c": null, "e": true, "f": false, "g": false, "h": false, "i": false }
    

The function has two aliases, isstring or isstr.

is_null

  • Syntax:

    is_null(expr)
    
  • Checks whether the given expression is evaluated to be a null value.

  • Arguments:
    • expr : an expression (any type is allowed).
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean on whether the variable is a null or not,
    • a missing if the input is missing.
  • Example:

    { "v1": is_null(null), "v2": is_null(1), "v3": is_null(missing) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": true, "v2": false }
    

The function has an alias isnull.

is_missing

  • Syntax:

    is_missing(expr)
    
  • Checks whether the given expression is evaluated to be a missing value.

  • Arguments:
    • expr : an expression (any type is allowed).
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean on whether the variable is a missing or not.
  • Example:

    { "v1": is_missing(null), "v2": is_missing(1), "v3": is_missing(missing) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": false, "v2": false, "v3": true }
    

The function has an alias ismissing.

is_unknown

  • Syntax:

    is_unknown(expr)
    
  • Checks whether the given variable is a null value or a missing value.

  • Arguments:
    • expr : an expression (any type is allowed).
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean on whether the variable is a null/`missing value (true) or not (false).
  • Example:

    { "v1": is_unknown(null), "v2": is_unknown(1), "v3": is_unknown(missing) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": true, "v2": false, "v3": true }
    

The function has an alias isunknown.

Conditional Functions [Back to TOC]

if_null (ifnull)

  • Syntax:

    if_null(expression1, expression2, ... expressionN)
    
  • Finds first argument which value is not null and returns that value

  • Arguments:
    • expressionI : an expression (any type is allowed).
  • Return Value:
    • a null if all arguments evaluate to null or no arguments specified
    • a value of the first non-null argument otherwise
  • Example:

    {
        "a": if_null(),
        "b": if_null(null),
        "c": if_null(null, "asterixdb"),
        "d": is_missing(if_null(missing))
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "a": null, "b": null, "c": "asterixdb", "d": true }
    

The function has an alias ifnull.

if_missing (ifmissing)

  • Syntax:

    if_missing(expression1, expression2, ... expressionN)
    
  • Finds first argument which value is not missing and returns that value

  • Arguments:
    • expressionI : an expression (any type is allowed).
  • Return Value:
    • a null if all arguments evaluate to missing or no arguments specified
    • a value of the first non-missing argument otherwise
  • Example:

    {
        "a": if_missing(),
        "b": if_missing(missing),
        "c": if_missing(missing, "asterixdb"),
        "d": if_missing(null, "asterixdb")
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "a": null, "b": null, "c": "asterixdb", "d": null }
    

The function has an alias ifmissing.

if_missing_or_null (ifmissingornull)

  • Syntax:

    if_missing_or_null(expression1, expression2, ... expressionN)
    
  • Finds first argument which value is not null or missing and returns that value

  • Arguments:
    • expressionI : an expression (any type is allowed).
  • Return Value:
    • a null if all arguments evaluate to either null or missing, or no arguments specified
    • a value of the first non-null, non-missing argument otherwise
  • Example:

    {
        "a": if_missing_or_null(),
        "b": if_missing_or_null(null, missing),
        "c": if_missing_or_null(null, missing, "asterixdb")
    };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "a": null, "b": null, "c": "asterixdb" }
    

The function has an alias ifmissingornull.

Miscellaneous Functions [Back to TOC]

uuid

  • Syntax:

    uuid()
    
  • Generates a uuid.

  • Arguments:
    • none
  • Return Value:
    • a generated, random uuid.

len

  • Syntax:

    len(array)

  • Returns the length of the array array.

  • Arguments:
    • array : an array, multiset, null, or missing, represents the collection that needs to be checked.
  • Return Value:
    • an integer that represents the length of input array or the size of the input multiset,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value.
  • Example:

    len(["Hello", "World"])
    
  • The expected result is:

    2
    

not

  • Syntax:

    not(expr)
    
  • Inverts a boolean value

  • Arguments:
    • expr : an expression
  • Return Value:
    • a boolean, the inverse of expr,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value,
    • other non-boolean argument value will cause a type error.
  • Example:

    { "v1": `not`(true), "v2": `not`(false), "v3": `not`(null), "v4": `not`(missing) };
    
  • The expected result is:

    { "v1": false, "v2": true, "v3": null }
    

range

  • Syntax:

    range(start_numeric_value, end_numeric_value)
    
  • Generates a series of bigint values based start the start_numeric_value until the end_numeric_value.

  • Arguments:
  • start_numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint value representing the start value.
  • end_numeric_value: a tinyint/smallint/integer/bigint value representing the max final value.
  • Return Value:
    • an array that starts with the integer value of start_numeric_value and ends with the integer value of end_numeric_value, where the value of each entry in the array is the integer successor of the value in the preceding entry.
  • Example:

    range(0, 3);
    
  • The expected result is:

    [ 0, 1, 2, 3 ]
    

switch_case

  • Syntax:

    switch_case(
        condition,
        case1, case1_result,
        case2, case2_result,
        ...,
        default, default_result
    )
    
  • Switches amongst a sequence of cases and returns the result of the first matching case. If no match is found, the result of the default case is returned.

  • Arguments:
    • condition: a variable (any type is allowed).
    • caseI/default: a variable (any type is allowed).
    • caseI/default_result: a variable (any type is allowed).
  • Return Value:
    • caseI_result if condition matches caseI, otherwise default_result.
  • Example 1:

    switch_case(
        "a",
        "a", 0,
        "x", 1,
        "y", 2,
        "z", 3
    );
    
  • The expected result is:

    0
    
  • Example 2:

    switch_case(
        "a",
        "x", 1,
        "y", 2,
        "z", 3
    );
    
  • The expected result is:

    3
    

deep_equal

  • Syntax:

    deep_equal(expr1, expr2)
    
  • Assess the equality between two expressions of any type (e.g., object, arrays, or multiset). Two objects are deeply equal iff both their types and values are equal.
  • Arguments:
    • expr1 : an expression,
    • expr2 : an expression.
  • Return Value:
    • true or false depending on the data equality,
    • missing if any argument is a missing value,
    • null if any argument is a null value but no argument is a missing value.
  • Example:

    deep_equal(
               {
                 "id":1,
                 "project":"AsterixDB",
                 "address":{"city":"Irvine", "state":"CA"},
                 "related":["Hivestrix", "Preglix", "Apache VXQuery"]
               },
               {
                 "id":1,
                 "project":"AsterixDB",
                 "address":{"city":"San Diego", "state":"CA"},
                 "related":["Hivestrix", "Preglix", "Apache VXQuery"]
               }
    );
    
  • The expected result is:

    false